Marine biologist captures rare footage of hundreds of endangered sharks

Time to get out of the water! Swarm of hundreds of hammerhead sharks are caught on video by marine biologist off the Galapagos islands

  • Dr Simon Pierce, 39, took the footage of the group of hammerhead sharks off Darwin Island in the Galapagos 
  • Using a remote camera to capture their movements Dr Pierce shot the sharks swimming in a huge group 
  • The protected sharks can be seen peacefully swimming past the camera as they stalked the remote waters 

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Hundreds of hammerhead sharks, known for being notoriously shy, have been captured in rare footage shot near the Galapagos Islands,

Dr Simon Pierce, 39, filmed the herd of hammerheads in the Galapagos National Park with a remote camera so he did not disturb the sharks.

The photos and videos were taken at one of the world’s most remote scuba diving locations, Darwin Island in the far north of the Galapagos Islands.

Simon, from New Plymouth in New Zealand, said: ‘Seeing the hammerheads was one of the most amazing days of my life.

‘I became a marine biologist to have the opportunity to see some amazing places and animals as a part of my work, and photography is a great way to share them with people.’ 

He added: ‘This video was captured in an area where no shark fishing is allowed. This is what a healthy marine protected area can look like. 

Stunning photographs showed the endangered sharks swimming together in a huge group accompanied by dozens of smaller fish

Stunning photographs showed the endangered sharks swimming together in a huge group accompanied by dozens of smaller fish

Dr Simon Pierce, 39, (pictured) filmed the herd of hammerheads in the remote Galapagos National Park which is home to some of the world's most exotic marine life

Dr Simon Pierce, 39, (pictured) filmed the herd of hammerheads in the remote Galapagos National Park which is home to some of the world’s most exotic marine life

Hammerhead sharks are one of the most endangered species of the animal. The status given to these sharks is as a result of overfishing and demand for their fins, an expensive delicacy in some countries

Hammerhead sharks are one of the most endangered species of the animal. The status given to these sharks is as a result of overfishing and demand for their fins, an expensive delicacy in some countries

Their unique heads are used as a weapon when hunting down prey. The hammerhead shark uses its head to pin down stingrays and eats the ray when the ray is weak and in shock

Their unique heads are used as a weapon when hunting down prey. The hammerhead shark uses its head to pin down stingrays and eats the ray when the ray is weak and in shock

According to the International Shark Attack File, humans have been subject to 17 documented, unprovoked attacks by hammerhead sharks in the last 500 years - with no deaths reported

According to the International Shark Attack File, humans have been subject to 17 documented, unprovoked attacks by hammerhead sharks in the last 500 years – with no deaths reported

The footage was shot using a remote camera set up on a rocky outcrop on near the island's shore as the sharks swam in the waters above

The footage was shot using a remote camera set up on a rocky outcrop on near the island’s shore as the sharks swam in the waters above

Darwin Island in the far north of the Galapagos Islands attracts whale sharks from June to November, as well as hammerhead, Galápagos, silky and blacktip sharks

Darwin Island in the far north of the Galapagos Islands attracts whale sharks from June to November, as well as hammerhead, Galápagos, silky and blacktip sharks

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