‘I’m GLAD he’s dead – burn in hell’ says estranged wife of Jeremy Kyle guest who ‘killed himself’

‘I’m GLAD he’s dead – he was a paedophile’: Ex-wife of the Jeremy Kyle guest who ‘killed himself’ after appearing on the show says she spent 15 years terrified of her abusive husband

  • Dianne Healing, 48, was briefly married to Steve Dymond 15 years ago but is now ‘celebrating his death’ 
  • She said suffered physical abuse at the hands of the 63-year-old, who died in Portsmouth last week
  • A week earlier he had filmed episode of ITV show, which he had gone on with his on-and-off girlfriend 
  • Kyle has spoken out after show was axed for good, saying he was ‘utterly devastated by recent events’

Advertisement
Dianne Healing said she spent 15 years so 'terrified' of her husband Stephen Dymond, 63, that she is now a recluse

Dianne Healing said she spent 15 years so ‘terrified’ of her husband Stephen Dymond, 63, that she is now a recluse

The ex-wife of the man who is feared to have killed himself after failing a lie detector test on The Jeremy Kyle Show has claimed he was a paedophile and ‘far from an innocent man’.

Dianne Healing, 48, was briefly married to Steve Dymond 15 years ago but told MailOnline how she is ‘celebrating his death’ because of the physical and mental abuse she says he put her through.

The 63-year-old died at his flat in Portsmouth less than a week after filming an episode of the controversial ITV daytime chat show, which he had gone on with his on-and-off girlfriend Jane Callaghan.

Mr Dymond had failed a lie detector test taken on the show to prove he had not been unfaithful and the couple split soon after.

Unemployed Miss Healing told MailOnline: ‘The truth is, he was a paedophile, and I want people to know the truth. He was a prolific liar – to see people feeling sorry for him is horrible. What he did was disgusting.’

MailOnline understands Mr Dymond was arrested but never charged over allegations of child abuse made against him several years ago. 

The news comes as Jeremy Kyle has said he is ‘utterly devastated’ after the cancellation of his TV show following the death of Mr Dymond. 

Kyle said: ‘Myself and the production team I worked with for the last 14 years are all utterly devastated by the recent events. Our thoughts and sympathies are with Steve’s family at this incredibly sad time.’

A week after filming the episode on May 2, Mr Dymond’s body was found at a block of flats in Portsmouth.

Friends fear Mr Dymond took his life due to the stress of the break-up and from the fall-out from being on the show. ITV bosses earlier today made the decision to cancel the Jeremy Kyle Show for good.

Yet Miss Healing from Poole in Dorset claims her former husband is far from being a victim. She said: ‘He was a bullying, controlling man who tried to take over my life and those of my children. What he put us through was hell. 

‘I used to think he was a gentle giant when I first met him but it couldn’t have been further from the truth. On one occasion, I was standing on the doorstep by the patio door at home and I was challenging him on his behaviour. 

Dianne Healing on holiday in Devon with Steve Dymond in 2004. Yesterday it emerged the pair married in 2004 after Mrs Healing uploaded a marriage certificate to social media

Dianne Healing on holiday in Devon with Steve Dymond in 2004. Yesterday it emerged the pair married in 2004 after Mrs Healing uploaded a marriage certificate to social media

Steven Dymond, 62, (pictured) was said to have been left in tears and feeling suicidal after filming for the show with his on-and-off girlfriend

Jeremy Kyle (pictured on Tuesday at his home in Berkshire)

Steven Dymond, 62, (pictured) was said to have been left in tears and feeling suicidal after filming for the show, hosted by Jeremy Kyle (pictured on Tuesday at his home in Berkshire)

Kyle is a father-of-four who became engaged to Vicky Burton, 37, his children's former nanny, in February 2018. They are pictured together at the Cheltenham Festival the following month

Kyle is a father-of-four who became engaged to Vicky Burton, 37, his children’s former nanny, in February 2018. They are pictured together at the Cheltenham Festival the following month

Mr Dymond was said to have been left in tears after filming for the show with his on-and-off girlfriend, Jane Callaghan (above)

Mr Dymond was said to have been left in tears after filming for the show with his on-and-off girlfriend, Jane Callaghan (above)

Dianne Healing's wedding certificate showing her betrothal to Mr Dymond in October 2004 when they lived in Poole

Dianne Healing’s wedding certificate showing her betrothal to Mr Dymond in October 2004 when they lived in Poole

‘He grabbed me around the shoulders and lifted me up as though I was as light as a feather and then hurled me onto the ground. From that moment on, I knew he wasn’t to be trusted and I left him.’

The couple had married in October 2004 after only meeting earlier that year. She said: ‘I met Steve when I was in my early 30s. I used to take my daughters to a park near to where he used to live.

Kyle ‘utterly devastated’ after cancellation of show

Jeremy Kyle has said he is ‘utterly devastated’ after the cancellation of his TV show following the death of a guest.

The confrontational talk show was suspended indefinitely by ITV on Monday following the death of a participant, 63-year-old Steve Dymond, a week after a programme featuring him was filmed.

The programme, which had been a regular fixture in the TV schedule since 2005, has now ended for good following calls for it to be cancelled from MPs and members of the public.

Kyle said: ‘Myself and the production team I worked with for the last 14 years are all utterly devastated by the recent events.

‘Our thoughts and sympathies are with Steve’s family at this incredibly sad time.’

Following the cancellation of the daytime show, MPs launched an inquiry into reality TV.

‘He approached me and asked if he could take me out, I wasn’t sure about him to be honest but my friends encouraged me to take the plunge.

‘Steve came across as a gentle giant and I did feel protected by him and to begin with safe. I was abused as a child and I told him fairly early on about this. He told me that he would always be there for me.

‘We married in October 2004 months after first meeting, it was really quick. It was only a few months into our married life when I began to have my suspicions about him.

‘From that point on I never trusted him, I used to look through his phone and ask his friends about him. His manner began to change when I started to challenge him on his behaviour. He got snappy and irritated.

‘He’d try and say that I was imagining the worst because of what I went through as a child.’ 

However, just four months after their wedding day, Miss Healing said she and her daughters had to flee to a woman’s refuge because of his volatile behaviour.

She added: ‘There was a time just after I’d left him that I’d gone to get some stuff from the marital house.

‘I asked my former partner, the father of my youngest daughter, if he could give me a lift.

‘When I got the house, I got what I needed quickly and was heading out but Steve was at home and he heard me and chased me out. He was holding a section of scaffolding pole. He looked like he wanted to kill me.  

Dianne Healing on holiday in Devon with Steve Dymond in 2004. Just four months after their wedding day, Dianne said she and her daughters had to flee to a woman's refuge because of his volatile behaviour

Dianne Healing on holiday in Devon with Steve Dymond in 2004. Just four months after their wedding day, Dianne said she and her daughters had to flee to a woman’s refuge because of his volatile behaviour

Dianne Healing, 48, was briefly married to Steve Dymond (pictured on holiday in Devon in 2004) 15-years ago but told MailOnline how she is 'celebrating his death' because of the abuse she says he put her through

Dianne Healing, 48, was briefly married to Steve Dymond (pictured on holiday in Devon in 2004) 15-years ago but told MailOnline how she is ‘celebrating his death’ because of the abuse she says he put her through

Mr Dymond was discovered dead in the room he had been renting since separating from Miss Callaghan, who appeared on the television show beside him (pictured together)

Mr Dymond was discovered dead in the room he had been renting since separating from Miss Callaghan, who appeared on the television show beside him (pictured together) 

Mr Dymond's body was found in a flat on this road in Portsmouth on May 9, pictured on Tuesday

Mr Dymond’s body was found in a flat on this road in Portsmouth on May 9, pictured on Tuesday

‘I jumped in to my former partner’s van and we drove off. Now he is dead, I want people to know what happened and how he was far from an innocent man.

‘I’m glad he’s no longer here and I believe he took his own life because he was worried what was going to come out after he appeared on Jeremy Kyle.’ 

MPs launch inquiry into reality TV including Love Island contestant deaths

MPs launched an inquiry into reality television yesterday in the wake of the cancellation of The Jeremy Kyle Show following the suspected suicide of a grandfather who failed a lie detector test while appearing on the programme.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport Committee announced the probe just hours after ITV axed the morning show a week after Steven Dymond, 63, was found dead at home in Portsmouth.

The committee said it was also prompted to launch its investigation by the deaths of former Love Island contestants Sophie Gradon, 32, and Mike Thalassitis, 26, in the past year.

DCMS committee chairman Damian Collins said: ‘ITV has made the right decision to permanently cancel the Jeremy Kyle Show. However, that should not be the end of the matter.

‘There needs to be an independent review of the duty of care TV companies have to participants in reality TV shows and the DCMS select committee has decided to hold an inquiry this summer into these issues.

‘Programmes like The Jeremy Kyle Show risk putting people who might be vulnerable on to a public stage at a point in their lives when they are unable to foresee the consequences, either for themselves or their families.

‘This kind of TV featuring members of the public attracts viewing figures in the millions but in return for ratings, the broadcasters must demonstrate their duty of care to the people whose personal lives are being exposed.

‘With an increasing demand for this type of programming, we’ll be examining broadcasting regulation in this area – is it fit for purpose?’

Ofcom has said that despite the cancellation of The Jeremy Kyle Show it will still review the findings of ITV’s probe into the episode in question carefully.

The committee has asked the public, organisations and experts to provide MPs with written evidence addressing the following questions:

  • What psychological support do production companies and broadcasters provide to participants in reality TV shows before, during and after the production process?
  • What are examples of best practice, and where is there room for improvement, in the support that is offered to reality TV participants?
  • Who should be responsible for monitoring whether duty of care policies are being applied effectively in the production of reality TV shows?
  • Do the design formats for reality shows put unfair psychological pressure on participants and encourage more extreme behaviour? If so, how?
  • What is for the future for reality TV of this kind? How does it accord with our understanding of, and evolving attitudes to, mental health?

Submissions should be no more than 3,000 words, have numbered paragraphs and should be submitted by 5pm on June 13 via this link.

The confrontational talk show was suspended indefinitely by ITV on Monday following the death of a Mr Dymond, a week after a programme featuring him was filmed on May 2.

The programme, which had been a regular fixture in the TV schedule since 2005, has now ended for good following calls for it to be cancelled from MPs and members of the public.

Following the cancellation of the daytime show, MPs launched an inquiry into reality TV.

The Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee (DCMS) will consider production companies’ duty of care to participants taking part in reality shows and explore whether enough support is offered both during and after filming.

ITV has also faced scrutiny over its support for reality show talent following the deaths of former Love Island contestants Sophie Gradon and Mike Thalassitis.

DCMS committee chairman Damian Collins said ITV ‘has made the right decision to permanently cancel the Jeremy Kyle Show’, but ‘that should not be the end of the matter’.

In a statement, he said: ‘There needs to be an independent review of the duty of care TV companies have to participants in reality TV shows and the DCMS select committee has decided to hold an inquiry this summer into these issues.

‘Programmes like The Jeremy Kyle Show risk putting people who might be vulnerable on to a public stage at a point in their lives when they are unable to foresee the consequences, either for themselves or their families.

‘This kind of TV featuring members of the public attracts viewing figures in the millions but in return for ratings, the broadcasters must demonstrate their duty of care to the people whose personal lives are being exposed.

‘With an increasing demand for this type of programming, we’ll be examining broadcasting regulation in this area – is it fit for purpose?’

ITV chief executive Dame Carolyn McCall announced this morning that the show had been officially cancelled ‘given the gravity of recent events’.

She said in a statement: ‘The Jeremy Kyle Show has had a loyal audience and has been made by a dedicated production team for 14 years, but now is the right time for the show to end.

‘Everyone at ITV’s thoughts and sympathies are with the family and friends of Steve Dymond.’

The broadcaster said it will continue to work with Kyle on other projects, but it has not specified what those will be.

Before the programme was axed, Dame Carolyn had told ITV staff in an email that halting filming and broadcasting of the show was ‘the best way we think we can protect the show and the production team’ from the reaction to Mr Dymond’s death.

Mr Dymond’s body was found at an address in Portsmouth on May 9. Hampshire Police said the death is not being treated as suspicious and a file is being prepared for the coroner.

ITV will announce what will replace The Jeremy Kyle Show in the TV schedule in due course.

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123, or visit a local Samaritans branch. See samaritans.org 

Empire that cruelty built: Two luxury homes near Windsor Castle at £5.4m, a stable of race horses and a £2m Barbados bolthole… ALISON BOSHOFF on where Jeremy Kyle has lavished his TV millions

By ALISON BOSHOFF FOR THE DAILY MAIL

Jeremy Kyle was paid almost £39,000 a week thanks to his £2m a year golden handcuffs deal with ITV

Jeremy Kyle was paid almost £39,000 a week thanks to his £2m a year golden handcuffs deal with ITV 

Jeremy Kyle could walk away with a £3million golden goodbye after ITV axed his disgraced chat show, the Daily Mail can reveal.

Even before the show was scrapped yesterday, Kyle had swiftly set up his own media company to safeguard his future.

He registered Hales Media Limited on Tuesday, giving his nanny-turned-fiancee Victoria Burton, 35, a stake.

The arrangement, potentially to shield future earnings comes after it was claimed that the presenter, known for his aggressive interviewing style, was ‘afraid of being made a scapegoat’ by ITV. Kyle has stayed silent but ITV made the drastic announcement it was scrapping his show hours after the Mail published a string of revelations.

These included how a husband accused Kyle’s producers of fabricating an entire story about his wife cheating – making the couple learn scripts and take a ‘fake’ lie detector test.

ITV said it ‘did not recognise’ the claims but it was just the start of a torrent of allegations against the ‘bear pit-style’ show, whose producers allegedly provoked confrontations among vulnerable guests to whip up a baying audience and boost ratings.

 It follows the suspected suicide of grandfather Stephen Dymond, 63, who was distraught after failing a lie test on the show and told relatives Kyle had ‘really laid into him’.

Mr Dymond was found dead at his Portsmouth flat by his landlady, who criticised Kyle, saying: ‘He has not even come forward and said he’s sorry.’ 

Jeremy Kyle, pictured at Ascot along with his horse Black Corton on February 17, 2018. The horse, trained by Paul Nicholls had just won the Sodexo Reynoldtown Novices Steeple Chase

Jeremy Kyle, pictured at Ascot along with his horse Black Corton on February 17, 2018. The horse, trained by Paul Nicholls had just won the Sodexo Reynoldtown Novices Steeple Chase

Shortly before 10am yesterday, ITV network chief Carolyn McCall admitted it was ‘the right time’ for the axe to fall, announcing: ‘Given the gravity of recent events we have decided to end production of The Jeremy Kyle Show.’

Kyle also owns this £3million house in Windsor, pictured

Kyle also owns this £3million house in Windsor, pictured

There has been no suggestion that Kyle has been criticised by ITV for his conduct on the show and Miss McCall said the channel would continue to work with him. More than 3,000 episodes have been shown since July 2005, attracting millions of loyal fans with argumentative discussions about sex and addiction, staged in front of a studio audience.

It was slammed as ‘bear baiting’ by MPs, psychiatrists and former participants and yesterday a parliamentary inquiry was launched into reality television over concerns the genre puts vulnerable contestants at risk.

It follows the suicides of two former contestants on the dating series Love Island, two years after each had appeared on the show. ITV said has brought in a policy where it now makes regular checks in on participants. 

Damian Collins, who chairs the Commons digital, culture, media and sport committee, said ITV’s decision to scrap Kyle’s show ‘should not be the end of the matter’ and there needed to be ‘an independent review of the duty of care TV companies have to participants in reality TV shows’.

He said: ‘Programmes like The Jeremy Kyle Show risk putting people who might be vulnerable on to a public stage at a point in their lives when they are unable to foresee the consequences, either for themselves or their families.’

Ofcom is also set to launch a review. Meanwhile, the future of ITV’s biggest daytime TV star is unclear. Based on media trends, Kyle is likely to walk away with a pay-off equal to his £3million annual salary.

Jermey Kyle, pictured with his ex-wife Carla and nanny Vicky Burton while on holiday in Barbados, where the star has a £2 million holiday home

Jermey Kyle, pictured with his ex-wife Carla and nanny Vicky Burton while on holiday in Barbados, where the star has a £2 million holiday home

He could be gearing up to move his show to the likes of Channel 5, which has a history of scooping up former ITV stars, or to launch his own programme with the help of his newly incorporated production company.

Legal experts suggested Mr Dymond’s family could sue ITV over his death as the programme had ‘a legal duty of care to protect him from foreseeable harm’.

Some fans criticised ITV, saying it was guilty of double standards by putting Love Island back on screen this summer despite the suicides of former contestants Mike Thalassitis and Sophie Gradon. And former X Factor contestant Lucy Spraggan alleged that ITV did not take enough care of its reality show stars. 

 But Kyle was given staunch backed by former EastEnders actress Danniella Westbrook, who said: ‘I’m devastated, because Jeremy has done a lot of good. If it wasn’t for Jeremy Kyle, I probably wouldn’t be alive.

‘At a time when I was very vulnerable he was the only one who stepped up and put me into rehab. A lot of people were fixed by Jeremy Kyle. I don’t think he broke anybody.’

The broadcaster said: ‘ITV takes our responsibilities very seriously and has duty of care measures in place for participants in all of our programmes. We welcome the Select Committee’s announcement and ITV will be fully engaged in their inquiry.’ 

Twisted tricks of torture TV: From psychological manipulation to turn guests at each other’s throats to giving out tissues to prompt tears… a former producer on The Jeremy Kyle Show reveals its tawdry secrets

By ANTONIA HOYLE FOR THE DAILY MAIL

Backstage on The Jeremy Kyle Show, a wife stood trembling as she waited to confront her cheating husband in front of an audience.

At least, she assumed he had been unfaithful, and any doubt in her mind had long been dispensed of by the show’s staff.

She absolutely should be angry, they goaded. This was her opportunity to fight back.

Seconds before she stepped on stage, the producer touched her on the elbow. This might have looked like a comforting gesture.

Jeremy Kyle presenting his show, which was today axed by ITV

Jeremy Kyle presenting his show, which was today axed by ITV

In fact, as the producer who spoke on the condition of anonymity to the Mail yesterday said, it was anything but.

A clever tactic known as ‘anchoring’ was being deployed – designed to fire up the guest’s fury seconds before she walked on to set.

The producer in question had been trained in neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) specifically to manipulate guests’ reactions.

‘If I wanted to wind a guest up my trick was to touch their elbow every time they told their story,’ they said.

‘Touching them on their elbow again just before they went on stage would then make them angry. We were very good at bending them to our will.

‘It felt very coercive, the way we were taught to control people.’

For years, the fraught scenes that unfolded on the popular ITV daytime programme were often regarded as a harmless pantomime. How woefully misplaced that assumption seems now, after it has been alleged that guest Stephen Dymond took his own life because of his ordeal on the show.

Mr Dymond, 63, had failed a lie detector test to find out if he had cheated on his fiancee Jane.

The producer in question had been trained in neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) specifically to manipulate guests’ reactions

The producer in question had been trained in neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) specifically to manipulate guests’ reactions

 The producer in question had been trained in neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) specifically to manipulate guests’ reactions

After the test suggested he had been unfaithful, presenter Kyle apparently ‘ripped into’ Mr Dymond during filming, in scenes that have never been screened.

The vulnerable machinery operator from Portsmouth took an overdose shortly afterwards.

He is the not the only guest who appears to have been exploited.

Dwayne Davidson, 27, whose girlfriend took a lie detector test to prove she was not cheating in 2014, says he was goaded into anger and was so distraught by the resultant negative publicity that he tried to take an overdose in 2018. ‘They’re good at manipulating – it’s almost magic what they do,’ he said.

So what exactly did working on Jeremy Kyle entail? I spoke to two former members of Jeremy Kyle’s staff to find out – and uncovered a toxic combination of ambition, youth, exhaustion and stress that appears to have fuelled a climate in which a tragedy such as Mr Dymond’s death had long been anticipated.

‘The nightmare scenario was always that someone would come on your show and kill themselves, and you’d be held responsible,’ says one producer, who worked on the early series.

Now in their 30s, still working in television, and speaking on condition of anonymity, they added: ‘It is a miracle this hasn’t happened before. It was inevitable.’

Producers – who had an assistant and two researchers beneath them – had four days to turn around a show requiring three or four guests each. The hours were – and apparently are – ‘insane’, with 3am finishes on the days before filming in their Manchester studio de rigueur.

Working to the wire, guests were often found just hours before they were due to be filmed, making mistakes perhaps inevitable.

‘We’d be booking guests the night before, sending taxis to their home as we were trying to confirm their stories were true,’ they say.

‘There was immense pressure to find sensational stories with fights and swearing. Your professional progression relied on it.’

Some 95 per cent of guests were sourced through call-ins, via the number trailed on screen. On a good week, there would be 50 calls, with those whose dilemma could result in a lie detector or DNA test prioritised – a cheating husband or paternity dispute being sure fire ratings boosters.

The promise of a DNA test – which costs up to £600 – invariably enticed cash-strapped callers in crisis and wanting conclusive proof as to who, for example, had fathered their children.

The Jeremy Kyle Show has been pulled off air by ITV and suspended indefinitely (file image)

The Jeremy Kyle Show has been pulled off air by ITV and suspended indefinitely (file image)

‘There was no payment offered. We used to sell it as a holiday, with transport, food, DNA and lie detector tests and counselling on offer,’ one former researcher tells me.

‘These are naturally sensational stories, about infidelity,’ says the producer. ‘They offer a resolution, a definitive answer.’

Or do they? Mr Dymond, after all, apparently insisted he hadn’t cheated and many experts believe a lie detector test – a device conducted with a polygraph, that measures physiological indicators such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration – to be unreliable.

‘You can cheat on a polygraph and they’re not used in court,’ admits the researcher, who says the results were kept from guests until they were on stage to provoke maximum reaction.

‘I’d be very surprised if some of the results weren’t wrong. I remember guests in tears, fathers having to say goodbye to their children and leave in different taxis.’

Prior to going on the show, guests are assessed with a 16-page psychological report that sounds exhaustive but could, according to the researcher, be conducted in half an hour by people with no qualifications in this field.

‘We looked into their previous mental health, sexual history, relationship history and drug taking,’ says the producer. ‘We had a drugs book to help us. A bit of Prozac was okay – a lot wasn’t. Lithium was bad. A guest who had attempted suicide wasn’t ruled out – unless it was for a story involving lie detector or DNA tests because the stakes were so high.

Backlash: Fans of the Jeremy Kyle show have hit out at ITV, accusing them of hypocrisy for failing to axe Love Island after the deaths of Mike Thalassitis (pictured 2017)  and Sophie Gradon

The end of Jeremy Kyle has led for renewed calls for Love Island to be culled after Mike, 26, and Sophie, 32, (pictured 2016) both took their own lives

Backlash: Fans of the Jeremy Kyle show have hit out at ITV, accusing them of hypocrisy for failing to axe Love Island after the deaths of Mike Thalassitis (left)  and Sophie Gradon

‘We talked to their doctors and social workers, but there was no time to do CRB (criminal record) checks. People with criminal records could go on, but I wouldn’t put on someone who had committed a violent crime.’

Ultimately, it appears to have been up to the producers – most of whom were in their 20s – to make the call. ‘The people making these decisions are so young – you had to be able to cope with the hours and pressure. We were kids. I was a producer by my early 20s,’ they say. ‘You don’t question yourself as much at that age.’

Once the guests had been booked, their overnight accommodation was arranged at one of three hotels near the programme’s Manchester studio. Food vouchers were provided, cigarettes liberally dispersed to calm nerves (although I am told no alcohol was supplied) and every effort made to anger them before they appeared on stage. The producer I spoke to says Jeremy Kyle staff used NLP – the practice of understanding thought processes, language and behaviour – to manipulate guests before the show started.

For example, they explain: ‘If you get someone to say ‘yes’ three times it’s very difficult for them to say no. It’s a technique estate agents use.’

In other words, once someone had said they wanted revenge on their spouse, they would find it hard to retract that desire.

Another trick was handing a guest a tissue backstage: ‘If you wanted someone to cry – a mother grieving for her son – you’d crush a tissue in their hand.’

Warring factions – most shows had a husband and wife, siblings, or a parent and child in some kind of conflict – were separated until they went on stage.

‘The men were put in dressing rooms on one side, the women on the other, and we’d go from one side to the other getting them more riled up. We’d tell them they were here to get answers, and the last thing they wanted to do was leave without.

Another trick was handing a guest a tissue backstage reveals the former Jeremy Kyle producer

Another trick was handing a guest a tissue backstage reveals the former Jeremy Kyle producer

‘We’d baffle them with science about body language.

‘We told them to stand over their partners, gesticulate in their faces and walk off to get sympathy. It was stage managed.’

Guests were, they admit, ‘disorientated in an alien environment’.

Unsurprisingly, frightened guests were liable to lash out at staff. A researcher told me that within weeks of starting to work for the show – being paid £70 for 11-hour shifts that often didn’t finish until midnight – they were trying to defuse fraught situations.

‘I had a mother shouting and screaming at me while waiting for the results of a DNA test to find out who her child’s father was,’ they say.

‘I felt out of my depth. I said she needed to leave the anger until she got onto stage.’

But on stage, guests were often railroaded by Kyle, as Fergus Kenny, who appeared on the show to be reunited with his estranged 18-year-old daughter Hayleigh in February 2016, discovered.

‘[Producers] made it sound like it would be a happy reunion. So I agreed and the next day they sent a taxi to take me from Tamworth to Manchester,’ Fergus, 49, a former soldier who hadn’t seen Hayleigh for ten years, told the Mail.

‘I was in no way prepared for what happened when they started filming. Jeremy Kyle had not spoken to me at all before I found myself sitting opposite him with the cameras rolling. Then he just laid into me. He assassinated me.’

Thrice-married Kyle labelled Fergus a ‘disgrace’ and asked him why he hadn’t been crying himself to sleep every night.

‘Look at your daughter, you have failed her,’ he said. ‘You don’t deserve your daughter, pal.’

Fergus recalls: ‘I was left feeling totally worthless. When it finished, he told me to go with my daughter and they’d get some after care. Nothing came.

‘We just stayed in the room and then we were taken home.’

Both Fergus and his ex-wife Crissy, 59, a former Army counsellor, hold the show responsible for the breakdown of their marriage.

‘The way Jeremy Kyle spoke to Fergus was as if he’d put his hand down his throat and grabbed his insides and pulled them out,’ says Crissy. ‘It was absolutely disgraceful.’

As part of the programme’s much trumpeted ‘after care’, counsellors were made available in dressing rooms to soothe guests after their appearance. But, at least in the early years, the professional help offered was regarded as a chore by staff.

‘With the show over, we wanted to get on to the next one, or go to the pub,’ says the producer. ‘We offered counselling but were very glad when guests didn’t take it.

‘We’d say they might face a 90-minute wait, or we could get them into a cab straight away. We told them they were probably tired.

‘If they were humiliated they’d be keen to go. ‘Get me out of here as soon as possible’ was the common response.’

They acknowledge the attitude to ‘after care’ may have changed. Certainly another, more junior member of staff, who left more recently, was circumspect.

‘It was horrific to see people crying. All you can do is to tell them you’re very sorry and give them a cup of tea,’ they said.

A spokesman for ITV said Jeremy Kyle had ‘significant and detailed duty of care processes in place for contributors pre, during and post show which have been built up over 14 years’.

They said there was a ‘comprehensive assessment’ of guests carried out by a team consisting of ‘four members of staff, one consultant psychotherapist and three mental health nurses’. They added guests were ‘seen by a member of the welfare team after filming, their needs evaluated and they were given a welfare check by the production teams afterwards’.

Current Jeremy Kyle staff, I am told, only found out they had lost their jobs yesterday after hearing the announcement on the news. They are said to be furious.

And what of the producers I spoke to. Do they regret working on the show?

‘At the time I didn’t,’ one said, but added: ‘There is a reason I left. It doesn’t sit well with me now. I don’t think anyone has died because of the way I behaved. My conscience is clear. Would I do it again? Absolutely not.’

Additional reporting: Ross Slater and Stephanie Condron 

Jeremy Kyle Show’s ‘most hated guest ever’ reveals he’s struggled for work, is mocked in the street and even tried to kill himself after public shaming over ‘worst thing that’s happened in my life’ 

By MARK DUELL AND JOSEPH CURTIS FOR MAILONLINE

A man said to be the most hated guest ever on The Jeremy Kyle Show has told how he tried to kill himself after being publicly shamed on the ITV programme.

Dwayne Davison, 27, of Nottingham, revealed he has struggled for work and been mocked in the street following the ‘worst thing that has ever happened in my life’.

The guest said his treatment at the hands of the chat show’s producers and the subsequent YouTube clips of his appearance have caused him grief for five years.

Mr Davison spoke out following the death of show participant Steve Dymond, 63, who apparently took his own life one week after appearing on the programme.

Meanwhile self-confessed ‘sex addict’ father-of-eight Danny Fuller, who has appeared on the show five times, has claimed bosses deliberately ‘wind up guests’ and ‘fail to provide aftercare’. 

Dwayne Davison, 27, of Nottingham, appeared on The Jeremy Kyle Show five years ago

Dwayne Davison, 27, of Nottingham, appeared on The Jeremy Kyle Show five years ago

 Mr Dymond took a lie detector test on May 2 to convince fiancée Jane Callaghan he had not been unfaithful, but failed and was found dead in Portsmouth on May 9.

Yesterday, Mr Davison told the Guardian: ‘I’ve had loads and loads of abuse and in 2018 I decided I’d had enough. My girlfriend had some toothache medication.

‘I took a load of it, and I can’t remember the rest. A few hours later my girlfriend came upstairs and she called the ambulance.’

He briefly stopped breathing but medics were able to revive him before it was too late. Mr Davison said: ‘At the hospital they said I would have died. 

‘I know this is putting responsibility on other places but I 100 per cent put it on that show. That show has ruined my life. It’s evil.’

Mr Davison was in his early 20s and living in Nottingham when he became involved with the programme in 2014.

He was in a relationship with an older woman and became certain she was cheating on him. 

He sent a text message to the programme in the hope of a free lie detector test to set the record straight.

‘It’s the worst thing that has ever happened in my life,’ he said. ‘They put the spoon in and stirred around my whole life.’

Mr Davison said the video subsequently being uploaded to YouTube – which led to employers letting him go.

The video was viewed by millions and shared with captions describing him as the rudest and most hated guest in the show’s history.

He also claimed the show would intentionally provoke participants into causing offence.

Footage would be edited to cast them in an unflattering light and all subsequent aftercare by producers was undone by the final footage.

He also remarked on the speed he and his then-girlfriend were signed up after texting the programme.

Mr Davison was in his early 20s and living in Nottingham when he became involved with the programme in 2014. He is pictured on the show (left) with his partner Barbara Wane (right)

Mr Davison was in his early 20s and living in Nottingham when he became involved with the programme in 2014. He is pictured on the show (left) with his partner Barbara Wane (right)

A producer rang back and invited them to travel up to the show’s filming base in Salford.

‘Within an hour there was a taxi at the door,’ he said. ‘You don’t have time to think about it or phone your family. 

‘Once you’re at the hotel, you feel you have to do the show. My mum begged me not to go on.’

He also claimed not to have been questioned over mental health issues and signed a contract without having time to read it.

He claims to have been provoked by Kyle and producers, being warned ‘Jeremy hates people who don’t talk.’

‘When are they going to take it seriously?’ he said. ‘Is it going to take more people to die for them to think maybe we are ruining people’s lives?’ 

Meanwhile Mr Fuller, 36, from Bathgate, West Lothian, has appeared on the show with former partners and also with current girlfriend Shauner Procter, 18.

He accused bosses of encouraging ‘screaming and shouting’, while Miss Procter said workers on the show ensured guests were ‘hyped up’ so ‘adrenaline is rushing’ when they appeared.

Mr Davison, 24, pictured with partner Barbara Wane, 41, said being on the show ruined his life

Mr Davison, 24, pictured with partner Barbara Wane, 41, said being on the show ruined his life

Mr Fuller went on the show in 2011 with an ex, and revealed he had slept with 80 women and had been engaged to two lovers at the same time.

He went on again with the results of a paternity test and to accuse another former partner of trying to throw his pet dog, called Shirley Basset, under a bus.

The self-employed driver said the first time he went on the show there was aftercare, but questioned whether guests were appropriately supported.

Mr Davison, 24, with his partner Ms Wane, 41

Mr Davison, 24, with his partner Ms Wane, 41

Mr Fuller said: ‘All you get is a thank you and a postcard through the door.

‘They tell you to go out and not to hold back. They want you to play off each other and encourage it – the screaming and shouting.

‘They take you down the night before, put you in a nice hotel and give you a meal allowance.

‘They pick you up at 9am and then they separate you as much as they can. They put you in separate rooms for three or four hours.

‘There are runners or producers going backwards and forwards telling you they can’t believe what your partner said about you.’ 

Mr Fuller added: ‘There’s no calming down period. The first time I went on there was aftercare, fair play, but after that nothing.

‘The second time I went on I drove down and they took my car keys off me until I’d done my bit so I couldn’t go home.’

Miss Procter said: ‘I wouldn’t go on again. I was angry afterwards. They say you get aftercare but you don’t.

‘It’s really stressful. They ring you ten times asking the same questions. They hype you up so the adrenaline is rushing when you go on.’

Other guests have also had similar experiences, Mary Watson appeared on the show alongside her girlfriend Natasha Payne, to share the tale of their relationship and raise awareness of LBQT issues.

But the pair were shocked and offended when the their item was introduced as: ‘Next we meet the woman who’s trying for a baby with her transvestite partner.’ Mary, 30, said: ‘They twisted our story. If they had been honest with us I would have told them we didn’t want to appear. We really regret going on.

Father-of-eight Danny Fuller, 36, pictured with partner Shauner Procter, 18, and one of his children, claims the show has little aftercare and gives guests 'a thank you and a postcard'

Father-of-eight Danny Fuller, 36, pictured with partner Shauner Procter, 18, and one of his children, claims the show has little aftercare and gives guests ‘a thank you and a postcard’

‘I thought it was going to be an informative show, focusing on Tasha’s experience, family and relationships. But that’s not what we got.

‘Everything that was said simply didn’t happen.’

Mary, a Subway manager and Natasha, 56, a consultant engineer, were taken by taxi from their home in North Shields to Manchester and put up in a hotel the day before the appearance in December 2014.

Mary explained how her and her girlfriend arrived at the hotel at around 11pm and were both phoned by separate researchers.

Mary says she mentioned in passing they had been trying for children before the show seized on this and made it the main focus of the appearance.

Mr Dymond apparently took his own life one week after appearing on the programme

Mr Dymond apparently took his own life one week after appearing on the programme

She added: ‘The following day all our possessions were confiscated – cigarettes, phones, everything. Then we got patted down. I was a little put off by that as it’s just a TV show. We’re not the kind of people who look for trouble.

‘We got taken to a waiting room, like a dressing room with a little TV.

‘You can’t go outside without a member of the crew escorting you.

‘We were in that room from 9am until 2pm. ‘We didn’t feel like guests on a TV show, we felt like prisoners.’

Mary and Natasha were eventually taken down to the studio and the side of the stage.

She explained: ‘We could see Jeremy Kyle playing up to the audience. ‘Then he said: ‘Next we meet the woman who’s trying for a baby with her transvestite partner.’

‘The crew next to me said: ‘I didn’t know they were going to say that.’

‘In the end the story was about the woman who was trying for a baby with her girlfriend.

‘By the side of the stage I was trying my best not to go too mental. I thought, this is just a joke now.

‘Then I shut down completely in front of the camera. They must have done all right with the editing because I didn’t seem too bad when I watched it back.’

Mary claims her and Natasha, who are still in a relationship, got very little aftercare and both regret appearing on the show.

She added: ‘I didn’t want to watch the programme anymore after that. I used to watch it all the time.

‘What’s happened with the suicide was really sad. ‘I think what Jeremy Kyle lost along the way is the fact they are dealing with people and their feelings.’

Judge: Show is a human form of bear baiting 

The Jeremy Kyle Show was branded a ‘human form of bear baiting’ by a judge sentencing a man who headbutted his love rival during filming.

Security guard David Staniforth shocked the studio audience when he attacked bus driver Larry Mahoney, leaving him with blood pouring from his nose. 

He had been invited on the show to describe how Mr Mahoney had an affair after moving into their home as a lodger.

Security guard David Staniforth shocked the studio audience when he attacked bus driver Larry Mahoney, leaving him with blood pouring from his nose in 2007

Security guard David Staniforth shocked the studio audience when he attacked bus driver Larry Mahoney, leaving him with blood pouring from his nose in 2007

He claimed he had been riled by Mr Kyle. The programme was aired with the attack edited out, but Mr Mahoney complained to police and Staniforth was arrested. 

He admitted assault and was fined £300. An ITV spokesman said the programme’s security guards had ‘reacted as swiftly as possible to defuse the situation’.

But district judge Alan Berg told Manchester Magistrates’ Court: ‘I have had the misfortune of viewing The Jeremy Kyle Show and it seems to me that its whole purpose is to effect a morbid and depressing display of dysfunctional people who are in some kind of turmoil.’ He said it was ‘a human form of bear baiting’. 

Another show guest killed himself ten months after going on TV to discuss problems in his relationship. Roger Irons, 21, went on the show alongside his partner Matthew Millington in 2007. 

A spokesman for the programme said at the time: ‘His death was not linked to the show and came well after his appearance.’

 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

News | Mail Online

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Powered by WP Robot

Scroll Up